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Hot Tub Glamping in Wales

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There are hundreds of places which are ideal for hot tub glamping in Wales. As one of the most dramatic parts of the British Isles, Wales itself is home to a large number of Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and National Parks. Many of these are fully equipped for the modern glamper, with purpose built facilities in place for glamping groups of all sizes, especially during peak times of the year.

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Find Glamping Sites In Wales For Less

  • STUDIO POD

    Caersws, Mid Wales / Sleeps 2-4

    Book from £55 Per Night - Nestled in Montgomeryshire, visit the River Severn just a few miles away or enjoy mountain biking, clay pigeon shooting & fishing all nearby.

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  • BLUEBELL

    Narberth, South Wales / Sleeps 2

    Book from £52 Per Night - Located in Pembrokeshire, you can stroll to the market town of Narberth or enjoy onsite facilities including a swimming pool, arcade & children's play area.

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  • SKYLARK POD

    Flintshire, North Wales / Sleeps 2

    Book from £47 Per Night - Situated in the small village of Caerwys, enjoy a host of activities nearby such as sailing, golf, riding & fishing. Conway & Snowdonia are also easily accessible.

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Why Go Luxury Camping Here?

Wales is also host to thousands of working farms, from the Valleys in the south of the country to the wilds of Snowdonia in the north. To supplement their income, farmers often welcome tourists, and some larger farms come with their own glampsites.

Welsh Glamping: The Ultimate Guide

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Wales also has a lot of coastline. From the Bristol Channel in the south, the Atlantic in the West to the Irish Sea and Dee Estuary the north, there are a huge amount of coastal resorts in place, many of which are ideal for glamping. The weather in Wales can be wet and windy, but purpose built glampsites provide shelter for many adventurous holiday makers all the year round. As Wales has a number of different types of geography, not all glampsites or other facilities are as exposed to the weather as those in the hills or on exposed coasts.

River valleys also offer a number of opportunities for glamping in Wales. The mighty River Severn rises in mid Wales, and flattens out to provide much of the border with England. Other major river systems throughout the country meander across hundreds of miles to make their way to the sea. These provide shelter for wildlife, plants and woodland, not to mention the sheep and other livestock which make up many of the working farms in Wales with glampsites. Coastal towns, historic cities and country villages complete the ideal offering for glamping trips of all sizes.

Pembrokeshire Coast

Situated at the far south west of Wales, jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean, is the Pembrokeshire Coast. Home of the National Park of the same name, this area combines coastal walks, rural beauty, historic tourist attractions and seaside holiday resorts. St Davids, the smallest city in the UK, sits at the heart of the National Park, and is said to be the last resting place of Wales' patron saint. The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path is integral to the Park, and has four designated walks around the coastal area. This type of activity is perfectly suited to glamping, with the luxury of a hot tub in your yurt to look forward to at the end of the day.

There are three major, five star glamping sites in Pembrokeshire. These are located to the east of Milford Haven, which is the major settlement on the Pembrokeshire Coast. Florence Springs and Apple Glamping are situated of the A477, which takes you from the coastal town of Pembroke Dock inland to Carmarthen, itself a major Welsh tourist attraction.

To the north of Milford Haven is the Eco Escape Campsite, which has a huge range of facilities ideal for the glamper. This glampsite is based around bell tents, and is dog friendly, which will appeal to many glamping families. There are caravan parks and coastal stays all the way round the Coast to Fishguard Bay, near Newport, on the northern section of the Coast.

Brecon Beacons

Home of another of Wales's national parks, the Brecon Beacons is world famous for its raw beauty. The area is heavily used by hikers, cyclists and athletes, as its steep hills test the toughest of bodies. Elite military units of the British armed forces also hold training camps in the Beacons, which goes to prove how rugged the terrain is.

The Brecon Beacons also has many wildlife sanctuaries, as it is unspoiled for as far as the eye can see. The area is home to some spectacular landscapes, carved out by water flowing through the district. There are many freshwater lakes and horse riding trails to keep all of the family occupied during your glamping holiday. The Brecon Beacons has also been home to humans for eight thousand years, so there is plenty for the history buff to enjoy.

There are three major glamping sites around the Beacons, to the north and east of the National Park itself. These make use of the relatively flat outer lying geography of this part of south central Wales, and are close enough to the National Park to offer fantastic days out. These are also close to the English border, with access to the cathedral city of Hereford.

Pembrokeshire Coast

Situated at the far south west of Wales, jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean, is the Pembrokeshire Coast. Home of the National Park of the same name, this area combines coastal walks, rural beauty, historic tourist attractions and seaside holiday resorts. St Davids, the smallest city in the UK, sits at the heart of the National Park, and is said to be the last resting place of Wales' patron saint. The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path is integral to the Park, and has four designated walks around the coastal area. This type of activity is perfectly suited to glamping, with the luxury of a hot tub in your yurt to look forward to at the end of the day.

There are three major, five star glamping sites in Pembrokeshire. These are located to the east of Milford Haven, which is the major settlement on the Pembrokeshire Coast. Florence Springs and Apple Glamping are situated of the A477, which takes you from the coastal town of Pembroke Dock inland to Carmarthen, itself a major Welsh tourist attraction.

To the north of Milford Haven is the Eco Escape Campsite, which has a huge range of facilities ideal for the glamper. This glampsite is based around bell tents, and is dog friendly, which will appeal to many glamping families. There are caravan parks and coastal stays all the way round the Coast to Fishguard Bay, near Newport, on the northern section of the Coast.

Brecon Beacons

Home of another of Wales's national parks, the Brecon Beacons is world famous for its raw beauty. The area is heavily used by hikers, cyclists and athletes, as its steep hills test the toughest of bodies. Elite military units of the British armed forces also hold training camps in the Beacons, which goes to prove how rugged the terrain is.

The Brecon Beacons also has many wildlife sanctuaries, as it is unspoiled for as far as the eye can see. The area is home to some spectacular landscapes, carved out by water flowing through the district. There are many freshwater lakes and horse riding trails to keep all of the family occupied during your glamping holiday. The Brecon Beacons has also been home to humans for eight thousand years, so there is plenty for the history buff to enjoy.

There are three major glamping sites around the Beacons, to the north and east of the National Park itself. These make use of the relatively flat outer lying geography of this part of south central Wales, and are close enough to the National Park to offer fantastic days out. These are also close to the English border, with access to the cathedral city of Hereford.

Snowdonia

To the far north west of Wales lies Snowdonia, home of the county's other National Park. Snowdonia, or Eryri in Welsh, was traditionally the home of the kings and princes of Wales, and was the last part of the country to be subdued by the English. The Welsh language is spoken more in this part of Wales than any other, and the area is studded with tourist attractions strongly linked to Welsh history and culture. Across the Menai Strait from the mainland is Anglesey, or Inis Mona, the Mother of Wales. The sheer number of castles in the area attest to its importance in Welsh history.

The landscape itself is the main reason Snowdonia was made into a National Park, which happened in 1951. Mount Snowdon itself is the highest of many mountains in the area, which is known for its wild highlands and deep valleys. This makes Snowdonia National Park very popular with climbers, abseilers, hikers and walkers, not to mention water sports, such as canoeing, kayaking and wild river rafting.

Perhaps for this reason, Snowdonia is the most popular part of Wales for glamping. There are many working farms and bespoke glampsites around the area, specifically aimed at the glamping community. Bell tents are very popular in the area, but other forms of accommodation include woodland cabins, safari tents and even gypsy caravans. Some disused local slate mines have also been converted into glampsites, with lodges overlooking quarries and the dramatic landscapes beyond.

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